eISSN: 1689-3530
ISSN: 0867-4361
Alcoholism and Drug Addiction/Alkoholizm i Narkomania
Bieżący numer Archiwum Artykuły zaakceptowane O czasopiśmie Rada naukowa Bazy indeksacyjne Prenumerata Kontakt Zasady publikacji prac Standardy etyczne i procedury
4/2020
vol. 33
 
Poleć ten artykuł:
Udostępnij:
więcej
 
 
Artykuł przeglądowy

Warianty genu FTO a  konsumpcja napojów alkoholowych

Anna Karolina Flaga
1
,
Anna Mach
2
,
Grażyna Gromadzka
1

1.
Faculty of Medicine, Collegium Medicum, Cardinal Stefan Wyszynski University, Warsaw, Poland
2.
Chair and Department of Psychiatry, Medical University of Warsaw, Poland
Alcohol Drug Addict 2020; 33 (4): 341-362
Data publikacji online: 2021/04/19
Plik artykułu:
- AIN-Flaga.pdf  [0.64 MB]
Pobierz cytowanie
ENW
EndNote
BIB
JabRef, Mendeley
RIS
Papers, Reference Manager, RefWorks, Zotero
AMA
APA
Chicago
Harvard
MLA
Vancouver
 
 

Introduction

Ethanol is a biologically active chemical substance present at various concentrations in all alcoholic beverages. In vodka, cognac and whisky the alcohol content averages 40-50%, in wine around 10-20% and in beer 3-7%. In Europe, one standard drink is considered to be 10 grams of pure alcohol, while blood alcohol level is defined per mille, i.e. the number of grams of ethanol in 1 litre of blood. According to the World Health Organization (WHO), alcohol is the third most important health-risk factor after smoking and high blood pressure. Alcohol consumption is one of the main risk factors for many conditions, including cardiovascular diseases, diabetes and cancer [1-3]. Alcohol also interferes with neuronal functions, particularly GABAergic neurons, which secrete γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) as a neurotransmitter. Its consumption may lead to activation of GABAergic receptors and inhibition of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors (NMDA receptor), which contributes to dysfunction in a variety of brain structures including the cerebral cortex responsible for, among other things, behavioural control. As a result of inhibition of the cerebral cortex due to alcohol consumption, strong agitation including aggressivenes can be observed and, over time in the case of chronic alcohol consumption, serious impairment of thinking skills or increased reaction time can be observed. Subsequently, alcohol contributes to dysfunction of other brain structures, including the limbic system, cerebellum, hypothalamus, pituitary gland and spinal cord [4-6].
Most people who consume alcohol associate it with pleasurable effects like a reduction of fatigue symptoms, lowering anxiety levels, relaxation and improved mood. This is related to the activation of the reward system and the release of dopamine. It is estimated that the increase in dopamine secretion associated with alcohol consumption can reach up to 200%. Dopamine is the catecholamine transmitter responsible for the feeling of ‘happiness’. However, the positive reinforcement mechanism can start to act in an uncontrolled manner, which usually leads to dependence [7]. From an epidemiological point of view, the dependence effect of alcohol is estimated to be moderate, with about 15% of alcohol users becoming dependent. This is less than for cocaine (17%), heroin (23%) or nicotine (32%) [8: 26]. Alcohol dependence is both chronic and relapsing in character [9]. A survey conducted by the Public Opinion Research Centre (CBOS) in 2017 on drinking patterns shows that the most popular alcoholic beverage in Poland is beer. Three out of four adult Poles (73%) admit to drinking beer at least once a month. When drinking vodka, the average drinker consumes once almost twice as much pure alcohol (11 standard drinks on average) as when drinking beer (6 standard drinks on average) and almost three times as much pure alcohol as when drinking wine (4 standard drinks on average) [10]. On the basis of his own observations, the Polish sociologist Jan Szczepański concluded that alcohol consumption patterns reflect the specific geographical, demographic and historical determinants of social existence. He referred to the numerous physiological, psychological, social, economic and political functions that alcohol fulfils [11: 7].
Due to the constantly growing number of people with psychoactive substance dependence, including alcohol, research is conducted in order to identify factors predisposing a subject to dependence, with most often psychological and biological factors being studied. Among others, a neurotransmitter concept of alcohol dependence has been developed based on disturbances in the activity of neurotransmitters forming the reward system associated with the brain dopaminergic system and the punishment system associated with the serotonergic system. An increased role of the reward system and a decreased role of the punishment system have been reported in alcohol-dependent individuals [9]. The development of molecular biology techniques has made it possible to conduct research to identify genetic factors that influence alcohol consumption and the dependency risk. Genetic factors are thought to be responsible for 50% of the risk of dependence with the remainder determined by environmental factors and genetic-environmental interactions [12].
The aim of this study is to present the importance of genetic variation concerning the sequence of the fat mass and obesity associated (FTO) gene in shaping predisposition to specific forms of alcohol consumption, based on a systematic review of previously published research results from PubMed, Science Direct and Wiley Online Library databases. Keywords such as “FTO and alcohol”, “FTO and alcohol dependence”, “FTO and alcohol abuse” were used to extract publications on the importance of genetic polymorphism of the FTO gene in alcohol use disorders (AUD). The sources focused on were 1) review papers, 2) retrospective and prospective studies and 3) clinical reports on aetiopathogenesis, diagnosis and therapy. Based on this methodology and for the purpose of review and synthesis of conclusions, work published between 2011 and 2013 and in 2019 were separated. Work on alcohol abuse disorders and other research on the general characteristics of the FTO gene and its association with depression and obesity, published between 1989 and 2019, were cited to introduce the reader to the presented issue.

Literature review

Genetic determinants associated with risky and harmful drinking

No single gene responsible for alcohol dependence has yet been identified. It is thought that dependence is determined in a multi-gene manner and that specific combinations of genes are important in shaping the alcohol dependence risk. Genes that may be associated with the risk of alcohol dependence include among others the so-called behavioural genes, the products of which are involved in the biological processes underlying bipolar affective disorder, unipolar affective disorder (depression) and schizophrenia as it has been observed that these diseases occur with higher frequency in families of alcohol-dependent individuals. These genes include the serotonin transporter gene 5-HTTLPR (chromosome 17), which affects the re-uptake of serotonin; one allele of this gene (‘s’ for ‘short’) is associated with a low level of response (LR) and increased alcohol tolerance (a trait with 0.4-0.6 heritability), which promotes heavy drinking and dependence [13-15]. According to the current view, genetic factors associated with polymorphism of many genes may determine intermediate traits called “endophenotypes”, which, together with environmental factors, determine the risk of heavy drinking and alcohol dependence [15-17]. A distinction is made between endophenotypes relating to a general predisposition to multi-substance addiction, resulting, inter alia, from specific personality traits or behavioural patterns, and endophenotypes relating to alcohol dependence like those associated with LR. The endophenotype concerning predisposition to dependence, associated with a phenotype of antisocial personality, impulsivity, irritability and disinhibition, may be conditioned by polymorphism in genes encoding neurotransmitter receptors like the GABRA2 gene (chromosome 4) that encodes the α-2 subunit of the membrane receptor binding the gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA). Other polymorphisms that may be associated with this endophenotype include variations in the muscarinic acetylcholine receptor M2 gene (CHRM2, chromosome 7), the aldehyde dehydrogenase gene (ADH4, chromosome 4), the dopamine D4 receptor gene (DRD4, chromosome 11), the dopamine D2 receptor gene (DRD2, chromosome 2) or the ACN9 gene (chromosome 7) [15, 18].
Another endophenotype may be related to the activity of enzymes involved in alcohol metabolism, including alcohol dehydrogenases (ADH) and aldehyde dehydrogenases (ALDH) [15, 19, 20]. Variants in genes encoding the above-mentioned enzymes may increase or decrease dependence predisposition by affecting amount of alcohol metabolism products, mainly acetaldehyde. The best known gene the mutation of which is associated with alcohol dependence, is the aldehyde dehydrogenase gene (ALDH2) located on chromosome 12. One of the variants of this gene (ALDH2*2) is associated with almost completely (in homozygotes) or partially reduced catalytic activity of the encoded enzyme, which at the biochemical level results in increased acetaldehyde concentration, and clinically manifests itself in the form of alcohol intolerance syndrome [15]. A lower risk of alcohol dependence is associated, among others, with polymorphic variants of the alcohol dehydrogenase genes: with the ADH1B*2 allele of rs1229984 and the ADH1C*1 allele of rs1693482 (chromosome 4). The enzymes encoded by the mutated genes lead to accelerated alcohol metabolism (respectively to 38-fold and 2.5-fold), compared with the rate of conversion of alcohol to acetaldehyde by the enzyme encoded by the ADH1B*1 and ADH1C*2 alleles; rapid metabolisation of alcohol to produce acetaldehyde is associated with an adverse reaction in the form of nausea and facial flushing [15, 21]. The published research findings, discussed later in this paper, suggest that a gene associated with alcohol consumption may be FTO (fat mass and obesity associated). This gene was identified as a potential ‘risk gene’ in one of the GWAS studies conducted.

GWAS studies on alcohol use disorders

Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) are now possible thanks to recent genetic and computer techniques. This strategy, which has revolutionised the scope of genetic research, uses so-called DNA micro-arrays, which allow the simultaneous analysis of hundreds of thousands of Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs) representing a large proportion of common variants in the human genome to identify genetic variants associated with risk of a particular phenotype occurence. These studies are costly and require the analysis of large numbers (many thousands) of study and control group participants. As GWAS strategy does not make a priori assumptions about candidate genes, this strategy may result in the discovery of new gene loci not previously associated with disease. In 12 GWAS studies focused on alcohol consumption published between 2009 and 2014, SNPs were identified in genes encoding alcohol-metabolising enzymes as being associated with risk of dependence [22]. In a meta-analysis of data on 14,904 alcohol-dependent and 37,944 control subjects, two variants of the alcohol dehydrogenase 1B gene (Alcohol Dehydrogenase 1B, class I Beta Polypeptide – ADH1B) were found to be associated with risk of dependence. A meta-analysis of GWAS results (N > 105,000 individuals of European descent) identified the gene encoding the klotho-β protein (KLB) (chromosome 4) as a factor modulating alcohol consumption [23].
GWAS performed using samples from the UK Biobank that allow to identify areas associated with alcohol consumption at a total of 8 loci, including:
• 3 loci of genes encoding proteins involved in alcohol metabolism, located on chromosome 4: the gene encoding Alcohol Dehydrogenase 1B, class I, Beta Polypeptide (ADH1B), the gene encoding Alcohol Dehydrogenase 1C, class I, Gamma Polypeptide (ADH1C) and the ADH5 gene encoding alcohol dehydrogenase 5, class III, chi polypeptide;
• 2 loci of the gene encoding Klotho protein (Klotho Beta – KLB);
• 3 new risk gene loci: the gene encoding the Glucokinase Regulator protein (GCKR) (chromosome 2), the gene encoding Cell Adhesion Molecule 2 (CADM2) (chromosome 3) and the gene encoding family protein from sequence similarity 69, member C (Divergent Protein Kinase Domain 1C, FAM69C, DIPK1C) (chromosome 18) [24].
In 2019, the results of the GWAS on alcohol abuse disorders were published. Disorders were diagnosed using a screening test developed by WHO known as AUDIT (the Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test) that measures alcohol consumption and alcohol-related problems [25]. In the study by Kranzler et al. the AUDIT-C subscale was used to assess frequency and quantity of alcohol consumption and frequency of binge drinking. They identified 10 independent loci in the population of Americans of European descent, 2 loci in African-Americans and 2 loci in the Hispanic-American group. Meta-analysis of data from all study populations identified 10 loci, including 3 for which an association with alcohol use had already been shown in previous studies: ADH1B (chromosome 4), ADH1C (chromosome 4) and ADH4 (chromosome 4), and several loci not previously described:
• GCKR (chromosome 2),
• the gene encoding the homeotic protein SIX3 (Homeobox Protein SIX3) (chromosome 2),
• the gene encoding the human Solute Carrier Family 39 Member 8 (SLC39A8) protein (chromosome 4)
• the dopamine receptor gene DRD2 (chromosome 11),
• locus on chromosome 10 q25.1,
• obesity susceptibility gene: FTO (chromosome 16) [25].

General characteristics of the FTO gene

The FTO gene was first identified in 2007 during the whole genome association study, the so-called Genome-Wide Association Study (GWAS). It is located on the long arm of chromosome 16 - locus 16q12.2 (Figure 1) and encodes an AlkB family protein with nucleic acid demethylase activity. It is a relatively large gene consisting of 9 exons and is over 400 kb in length. FTO is expressed mainly in the hypothalamus and plays an important role in energy homeostasis management of body and the regulation of fat mass by influencing lipolysis and preadipocyte differentiation. However, the exact physiological function of this gene has not yet been fully understood [26-34] (Figure 1). FTO is a polymorphic gene. To date, several structural variants of this gene of the CNV (copy number variation) type have been described and 87,028 variants of the SNP (single nucleotide polymorphism) type, 87 of which represent variations of potential or proven clinical importance [35].

The FTO gene and the relationship with depression and obesity

The hypothesis on the association of the FTO polymorphism with alcohol drinking was based on observations regarding its association with depression and obesity. As previously mentioned, depression is more prevalent in families of alcohol-dependent individuals and consumption of spirits has been shown to be associated with higher values of obesity indices [36-39]. The effect of wine or beer consumption on obesity indices in various studies has been evaluated either positively [38-40], negatively [38, 41] or not reported [42]. It has been shown that a drinking pattern characterised by frequent consumption of small amounts of alcohol can prevent obesity [43-45], diabetes and cardiovascular diseases [46, 47]. The likely mechanism involves induction of the microsomal ethanol oxidation system [48, 49] and/or inhibition of ghrelin secretion, which is responsible for eating behaviour [50, 51]. The published findings have indicated an association of some FTO polymorphic variants with an increase in body mass index (BMI), also with metabolic changes such as higher insulin, glucose and triglyceride levels (tested in fasting) and reduced levels of “good” HDL (high-density lipoprotein) cholesterol. An association between specific variants of the FTO gene and increased waist circumference as well as increased weight has been reported [26, 27]. One of the most studied FTO polymorphisms is rs9930506 within which alleles A and G are distinguished. It was shown that the presence of the G allele of rs9930506 FTO SNP increases the risk of developing obesity in the Polish population. Moreover, GG homozygotes are characterised by higher BMI values than A allele carriers on average by 1.5 kg/m2 [26, 27, 29, 30]. In other studies of the FTO polymorphism (rs9939609) distinguishing between the T and A alleles, the A allele predisposed to a hyperphagic phenotype and/or a preference for high energy foods [52-54]. The reported association of FTO polymorphism with individual food preferences was reproducible [51, 54-61].
Observations on the association between obesity and depression have led to the search for a link between FTO polymorphism and the risk of depression. In 2013, Samaan et al. showed that the FTO rs9939609 A variant may be associated with a lower risk of depression, independently of its effect on BMI [62]. In contrast, another study published in 2014 showed that the rs9939609 FTO variant determines an increased risk of depression, especially atypical depression [63].

The association of the FTO gene with alcohol consumption

In a cross-sectional study of the Polish population, it was hypothesised that FTO rs9939609 gene polymorphism may be associated with a pattern of alcohol consumption. A number of multivariate analyses were conducted to verify this hypothesis because of the complex relationship between alcohol consumption and BMI. These took into account the different consumption patterns related to the type of alcohol and the amount and frequency of drinking. The analyses also considered the amount of pure alcohol consumed expressed in grams per day (gram/day, g/d). It was shown that individuals with the AA genotype of FTO rs9939609 SNP consumed large amounts of alcohol at low frequency, whereas individuals with the other genotypes drank small amounts of alcohol daily [51]. For beer or vodka consumers, the AA genotype of FTO rs9939609 SNP was associated with consuming less than 0.21 g/day (p < 0.012) of pure alcohol, compared with individuals with the other genotypes. No similar relationship was noted for wine consumption.
The relationship between the AA genotype of FTO rs9939609 SNP and the amount and frequency of alcohol consumption was significant when parameters such as gender, age and BMI were included in the analysis. For spirits, the data obtained in multivariate analysis including gender and age were: for the frequency of spirits consumption, the odds ratio (OR) associated with having the AA genotype of FTO rs9939609 SNP was 0.89, the 95% confidence interval (CI) was 0.81-0.99; p < 0.025 and for the amount of spirits consumed, the OR was 1.06; 95% CI: 1.00-1.12; p < 0.034. In the multivariate analysis including gender, age and BMI, the rates for frequency of spirit consumption were OR 0.89; 95% CI: 0.81-0.98; p < 0.02 while the rates for quantity were not statistically significant (OR 1.05; 95% CI: 0.99-1.1; p < 0.88). For beer, in the multivariate analysis including gender and age, there was a lower frequency of consumption of this alcohol associated with the AA genotype of FTO rs9939609 SNP (OR 0.92; 95% CI: 0.87-0.98; p < 0.006) while there was no effect of genotype on the amount of beer consumed (OR 1.08; 95% CI: 0.90-1.28; p < 0.422). In multivariate analysis including gender, age and BMI, an association of AA genotype of FTO rs9939609 SNP with lower frequency of beer consumption was noted (OR 0.92; 95% CI: 0.87-0.98, p < 0.00); the association with the amount of beer consumed remained insignificant (OR 1.08; 95% CI: 0.9-1.28, p < 0.42). Regarding wine, in the multivariate analysis including gender and age, there was no association between AA genotype of FTO rs9939609 SNP and the frequency (OR 0.98; 95% CI: 0.88-1.08, p < 0.622) and quantity (OR 1.00; 95% CI: 0.90-1.10, p < 0.993) of consumption of this beverage. When gender, age and BMI were included in the multivariate analysis, an association between genotype and lower frequency of wine consumption was reported: OR 0.92; 95% CI: 0.87-0.98; p < 0.006; the association between genotype and amount of wine consumed remained insignificant (OR 0.98; 95% CI: 0.89-1.08; p < 0.70) [51].
In an analysis of the association of FTO genotypes with type of alcohol, amount and frequency of drinking, it was shown that among those who consumed spirits more than 1-2 times per week in amounts less than 100 ml, the prevalence of the AA genotype of FTO rs9939609 SNP was significantly lower than among those who consumed this type of alcohol in amounts greater than 100 ml (11.0% vs. 20.0% respectively; OR 0.46; 95% CI: 0.30-0.71; p < 0.0004). There were no differences in the frequency of occurrence of FTO genotypes between those consuming spirits less than 1-2 times a week in amounts less or more than 100 ml (20.6% vs. 21.2%, respectively). Differences in the distribution of FTO genotypes associated with beer consumption were similar in nature to those for spirits. Among those consuming less than 0.5 l of beer more than 1-2 times per week, the frequency of the AA genotype of FTO rs9939609 SNP was slightly lower than among those consuming more than 0.5 l of beer (18.0% vs. 21.0%, respectively; OR = 0.77; 95% CI: 0.55-1.06; p < 0.11). There were no differences in the prevalence of FTO genotypes between individuals consuming beer less than 1-2 times a week in amounts less or more than 0.5 l (21.0% vs. 22.2%, respectively) [51]. Individuals with the AA genotype of FTO rs9939609 SNP were characterised by consuming larger amounts of spirits, but with lower frequency, compared to individuals with the AT or TT genotype (Figure 2).
A lower prevalence of the AA genotype of FTO rs9939609 SNP (14%) was reported in the study groups of alcohol-dependent individuals, compared to the group of individuals previously participating in the Polish Large-Centre National Population Health Survey (20.4%). In order to more accurately estimate the prevalence of the AA genotype of FTO rs9939609 SNP among alcohol-dependent individuals, non-additive and additive regression analysis models were applied. Both models reported a lower frequency of the AA genotype (regression model: OR 0.64; 95% CI: 0.45-0.89; p < 0.005; additive model: OR 0.78; 95% CI 0.66-0.93; p < 0.004) [51]. The study by Corell et al. assessed the association between the carriage of two polymorphic gene fragments: FTO rs9939609 and MCR4 rs17782313 and the amount of pure alcohol consumption (expressed in grams/day, g/d) among individuals at risk of cardiovascular diseases. The MCR4 gene located on chromosome 18q22 encodes the melanocortin 4 receptor (MC4R), which is a 322-amino acid protein. It belongs to a family of seven transmembrane receptors coupled with G protein and transmits a signal by coupling to the heterotrimeric Gs protein and activation of adenylyl cyclase. It is mainly expressed in hypothalamic nuclei involved in the regulation of food intake and integrates a satiety signal provided by α-melanocyte-stimulating hormone (α-MSH) and an antagonistic (orexigenic) signal provided by agouti-related protein (AGRP). Activation of MC4R by natural or pharmacological agonists leads to reduced food intake. The role of this protein in maintaining energy balance has been demonstrated in mice. Mice genetically deficient in both MC4R alleles (MC4R –/– mice) develop severe obesity, whereas heterozygous mice (MC4R +/– mice) have a phenotype intermediate between MC4R –/– and the wild-type phenotype. The MC4R gene encodes the melanocortin 4 receptor, located in the hypothalamic region. MC4R plays an important role in the regulation of appetite and hunger response. It has been shown that individuals with the CC or CT MC4R genotype have a greater tendency to snack between meals and an increased appetite. Polymorphisms of the FTO and MC4R genes were examined in sum in a co-dominant model, dependent on the number of variable alleles of both genes. The distribution of FTO rs9939609 SNP genotypes was analysed: TT, TA, AA and MC4R rs17782313: TT, TC, CC [64].
It was shown that subjects with a genotype associated with the simultaneous presence of 4 variants of FTO rs9939609 SNP and MCR4 rs17782313 SNP consumed significantly less alcohol when taking into account the influence of parameters like gender, age, diabetes, total energy intake and physical activity in the analysis compared with subjects with fewer alleles of the genes studied. In a multivariate study concerning the average alcohol consumption depending on the number of alleles of FTO and MCR4, it was found that in the group characterised by the presence of 4 variants of these genes, the average consumption of pure alcohol was 6.5 g/d, for the group with 3 variants of the genes: 7.2 g/d, for the group with 2 variants: 8.5 g/d, for the group with 1 variant: 8.9 g/d, while for those with 4 wild-type alleles: 9.3 g/d, p < 0.001 [64]. In analyses in which qualitative data relating to maintaining or not maintaining (moderate or high alcohol consumption) abstinence were included instead of quantitative data on alcohol consumption, a statistically significant association was also reported between the summary variation index of the number of alleles of the genes studied and drinking habits. The highest proportion of non-drinkers was observed in the group with 4 FTO and MCR4 variants, compared with the group with 4 wild-type alleles (43.4% vs. 36.5%, respectively; ptrend < 0.01). In contrast, in the group characterised by heavy alcohol consumption, those with 4 wild-type FTO and MCR4 alleles had the highest (14.5%), while those with 4 gene variants had the lowest proportion (5.7%; ptrend < 0.01). The differences noted reached greater statistical significance in the male population in which alcohol consumption was higher than among women. Of the non-drinking men, those in the group with 4 variants had the highest proportion (28.6%) compared with those with 4 wild-type alleles (15.1%). In contrast, in the group of male drinkers, the most frequent genotype was associated with the presence of 4 wild-type alleles of FTO and MCR4 (27%) while the rarest was associated with the presence of 4 variable copies of these genes (14.3%) [64].
The evaluation of the relationship between the amount of pure alcohol consumed, expressed in grams/week (gram/week, g/w), and the occurrence of FTO rs17817449 and rs9939609 of SNP, was the subject of a study by Hubacek et al. [65]. The authors highlighted a coupling disequilibrium phenomenon between these two FTO polymorphisms equal to 100%. In this study, 3 cohorts were participated: a) the Czech cohort included in the MONICA (the acronym for “monitoring trends and determinants in cardiovascular disease”) study: 2559 participants, b) the cohort included in the HAPIEE (the acronym for “Health, Alcohol and Psychosocial factors In Eastern Europe”) study: 6681 participants in the Czech part of the study on health, alcohol and psychosocial factors in Eastern Europe, c) the members of a Slavic minority living in eastern Germany, called Sorbs: 948 participants. Genotype analyses of rs17817449 among 201 Czech patients with alcoholic cirrhosis were also performed. Data were analysed using logistic regression with additive mode of inclusion of variables, including age and gender. No significant association between rs9939609 or rs17817449 genotype and alcohol consumption was detected in any of the study populations. The p-values for the analyses on the association between the prevalence of rs9939609 or rs17817449 in the different cohorts and amounts of alcohol consumed were 0.47 for the MONICA cohort, 0.37 for the HAPIEE cohort and 0.82 for the Sorbs cohort. It was shown that the prevalence of CC, CT and TT FTO genotypes was not significantly different between the three study cohorts. When the results for the HAPIEE cohort were analysed, the mean consumption of pure alcohol (in g/w) including the different CC, CT and TT genotypes was: 174 g/w, 187 g/w and 177 g/w; p < 0.92 respectively. There were no statistically significant differences in the prevalence of frequency of individual FTO genotypes in the pooled data for the Czech cohorts (n = 9148, CC = 18.7%, CT = 48.3%, TT = 33.0%) and in patients with alcoholic cirrhosis (n = 201, CC = 13.9%, CT = 53.7%, TT = 32.3%, p < 0.16) [65].
In a study by Wang et al., involving two control groups and two groups of alcohol dependent persons included in the COGA (the acronym for „Collaborative Studies on Genetics of Alcoholism”) and in the SAGE (the acronym for „Study on global AGEing and adult health”) studies, 167 FTO SNPs were analysed [66]. Logistic regression analysis allowed the identification of the FTO alleles most strongly associated with excessive alcohol consumption among the study groups. In the SAGE group, the T allele of rs8062891 SNP (p < 0.00088), the C allele of rs1108086 SNP (p < 0.00086) and the T allele of rs1420318 SNP (p < 0.00086) were selected as associated with excessive alcohol consumption. The T allele of rs12597786 SNP and the C allele of rs7204609 SNP were also significantly associated with excessive alcohol consumption in the COGA group (p < 0.017 and p < 0.014, respectively). A meta-analysis including data on genetic variants of alcohol dependence risk for the two groups combined identified three polymorphic gene variants most strongly associated with alcoholism risk: the T allele of rs8062891 SNP (p < 0.00064), the T allele of rs12597786 SNP (p < 0.00076) and the C allele of rs7204609 SNP (p < 0.0011) [66]. An attempt was also made to determine the association between FTO rs17817449 SNP with TT, GT and GG genotype distinctions and the amount of pure alcohol consumed (in g/w) including gender [67]. Data on 26,792 Caucasian adults (47.2% male; mean age 58.9 ± 7.3 years) from the Czech Republic, Lithuania, Poland and Russia were analysed. Data were analysed among others on the amount of weekly alcohol consumed, the tendency to binge drink and a positive CAGE test score ≥ 2 used to catch early symptoms of risky/harmful drinking. The study found no significant differences in weekly alcohol consumption or binge drinking tendency between GG homozygotes and carriers of at least one T allele among either sex. Among men with the GG genotype, the percentage of confirmed cases by CAGE test ≥ 2 was lower than in the group with the TT or GT genotype of rs17817449 SNP (17.8% vs. 20.3%, p < 0.036). A similar relationship was not observed in women. After taking age and country of origin into account, the association between the GG genotype and a reduced risk of CAGE ≥ 2 positivity among men was confirmed. Including socio-demographic variables in the analysis as well as BMI and hypertension did not change this relationship [67].

Conclusions

The results presented above indicate that there is a relationship between FTO gene variants and alcohol consumption. It was observed that:
1) there is an association between the FTO genotype and the alcohol consumption pattern for the type, frequency and amount (g/d, g/w) of alcohol consumed (wine/vodka/beer) [51];
2) the association of the FTO genotype with the alcohol consumption pattern (amount/frequency/type) also depends on the genotype of other genes, including MC4R [64];
3) the association between the FTO genotype and alcohol consumption pattern is population dependent [65];
4) there are FTO variants that correlate with an increased predisposition towards heavy alcohol consumption, including the T allele of rs806289 [66];
5) the association of the GG genotype of FTO rs17817449 with the amount of alcohol consumption depends on gender and is more strongly expressed in men [67]

Wprowadzenie

Alkohol etylowy (etanol) jest substancją chemiczną aktywną biologicznie występującą we wszystkich napojach alkoholowych, które różnią się jego zawartością. W wódce, koniaku i whisky zawartość alkoholu wynosi średnio 40–50%, w winie około 10–20%, a w piwie 3–7%. W Europie za jedną porcję standardową alkoholu uznaje się 10 gramów czystego alkoholu, natomiast poziom alkoholu we krwi określa się w promilach, tj. w liczbie gramów etanolu w 1 litrze krwi. Według Światowej Organizacji Zdrowia (WHO) alkohol znajduje się na trzecim miejscu – po paleniu papierosów i nadciśnieniu – wśród czynników negatywnie wpływających na stan zdrowia. Spożywanie alkoholu jest jednym z głównych czynników ryzyka występowania wielu chorób, w tym chorób układu krążenia, cukrzycy czy nowotworów [1–3]. Alkohol zaburza też funkcje neuronów, szczególnie neuronów GABA-ergicznych, wydzielających jako neuroprzekaźnik kwas γ-aminomasłowy (GABA). Jego spożycie może prowadzić do aktywacji receptorów GABA-ergicznych i hamowania aktywności receptorów N-metylo-D- -asparaginowych (receptor NMDA), co przyczynia się do zaburzeń funkcji różnych struktur mózgu, w tym kory mózgowej, która odpowiada m.in. za kontrolę zachowania. W następstwie zahamowania kory mózgowej na skutek konsumpcji alkoholu można obserwować silne pobudzenie, w tym agresywność, a z czasem – przy przewlekłym spożywaniu alkoholu – poważne upośledzenie sprawności myślenia czy wydłużenie czasu reakcji. W dalszej kolejności alkohol przyczynia się do zaburzeń funkcjonowania innych struktur mózgu, w tym układu limbicznego, móżdżku, podwzgórza i przysadki oraz rdzenia kręgowego [4–6].
Większość osób spożywających alkohol utożsamia jego działanie z przyjemnymi efektami w postaci zmniejszenia nasilenia objawów zmęczenia, obniżenia poziomu lęku, rozluźnienia, poprawy nastroju. Ma to związek z aktywacją układu nagrody i uwalnianiem dopaminy. Szacuje się, że wzrost wydzielania dopaminy związany ze spożyciem alkoholu może osiągnąć wartość nawet do 200%. Dopamina jest przekaźnikiem katecholaminowym odpowiadającym za poczucie „szczęścia”. Mechanizm pozytywnego wzmocnienia może jednak zacząć działać w sposób niekontrolowany, co zazwyczaj prowadzi do uzależnień [7]. Z epidemiologicznego punktu widzenia siłę uzależniającego działania alkoholu ocenia się jako umiarkowaną – spośród osób mających kontakt z alkoholem uzależnia się około 15%. Jest to mniej niż w przypadku kokainy (17%), heroiny (23%) czy nikotyny (32%) [8: 26]. Uzależnienie od alkoholu ma charakter przewlekły i nawracający [9]. Z badania przeprowadzanego przez Centrum Badania Opinii Społecznej (CBOS) w 2017 r. dotyczącego modeli picia napojów alkoholowych w Polsce wynika, że napojem alkoholowym, po który Polacy sięgają najczęściej, jest piwo. Do picia piwa przynajmniej raz w miesiącu przyznaje się trzech na czterech dorosłych Polaków (73%). Pijąc wódkę, przeciętny konsument spożywa jednorazowo niemal dwa razy więcej czystego alkoholu (średnio 11 porcji standardowych), niż pijąc piwo (średnio 6 porcji standardowych), i prawie trzy razy więcej czystego alkoholu, niż kiedy pije wino (średnio 4 porcje standardowe) [10].
Polski socjolog, Jan Szczepański, na podstawie obserwacji uznał, że we wzorach konsumpcji alkoholu odzwierciedla się specyfika geograficznych, demograficznych i historycznych uwarunkowań społecznego bytu. Powoływał się m.in. na liczne funkcje, jakie spełnia alkohol, zaliczając do nich np. funkcje fizjologiczne, psychologiczne, społeczne, ekonomiczne i polityczne [11: 7]. Z uwagi na stale rosnącą liczbę osób uzależnionych od substancji psychoaktywnych, w tym od alkoholu, prowadzone są badania mające na celu wskazanie czynników predysponujących do uzależnień – najczęściej badane są czynniki psy- chiczne i biologiczne. Wypracowano m.in. koncepcję neuroprzekaźnikową uzależnienia od alkoholu opartą na zaburzeniach aktywności neuroprzekaźników kształtujących tzw. układ nagrody, związany z układem dopaminergicznym w mózgu, oraz układ kary, związany z układem serotoninergicznym. U osób uzależnionych od alkoholu odnotowano wzrost roli układu nagrody i zmniejszenie roli układu kary [9]. Rozwój technik biologii molekularnej umożliwił prowadzenie badań mających na celu wskazanie genetycznych czynników wpływających na spożycie alkoholu i na ryzyko uzależnienia. Uważa się, że czynniki genetyczne odpowiedzialne są za 50% ryzyka uzależnienia; pozostałą część ryzyka determinują czynniki środowiskowe i interakcje genetyczno- -środowiskowe [12].
Celem pracy jest przedstawienie znaczenia zmienności genetycznej dotyczącej sekwencji genu FTO (fat mass and obesity associated) w kształtowaniu predyspozycji do określonych form konsumpcji alkoholu na podstawie przeglądu systematycznego dotychczas opublikowanych wyników badań pochodzących z baz danych: PubMed, Science Direct oraz Wiley Online Library. W celu wyodrębnienia publikacji na temat znaczenia polimorfizmu genetycznego genu FTO w zaburzeniach związanych z używaniem alkoholu (AUD) posłużono się takimi słowami i hasłami kluczowymi, jak „FTO and alcohol”, „FTO and alcohol dependence”, „FTO and alcohol abuse”. Skupiono się na źródłach, którymi były 1) prace poglądowe, 2) badania retrospektywne i prospektywne, 3) doniesienia kliniczne dotyczące etiopatogenezy, diagnostyki i terapii. Na podstawie tej metodologii – w celu dokonania przeglądu i syntezy wniosków – wyodrębniono prace publikowane w latach 2011–2013 i w roku 2019. Prace dotyczące zaburzeń związanych z nadużywaniem alkoholu oraz inne prace na temat ogólnej charakterystyki genu FTO i jego powiązania z depresją i otyłością, opublikowane w latach 1989–2019, przytoczono w celu wprowadzenia czytelnika w prezentowane zagadnienie.

Przegląd literatury

Uwarunkowania genetyczne związane z ryzykownym i szkodliwym piciem alkoholu

Nie wykryto dotychczas pojedynczego genu odpowiedzialnego za uzależnienie od alkoholu. Uważa się, że jest ono determinowane w sposób wielogenowy i że określone kombinacje genów mają znaczenie w kształtowaniu ryzyka uzależnienia od alkoholu. Genami, które mogą być związane z ryzykiem uzależnienia, są m.in. tzw. geny behawioralne – ich produkty uczestniczą w procesach biologicznych leżących u podłoża zaburzenia afektywnego dwubiegunowego, jednobiegunowego (depresji) czy schizofrenii, gdyż zauważono, że choroby te występują z większą częstością w rodzinach osób uzależnionych od alkoholu. Wśród tych genów można wymienić gen transportera serotoniny 5-HTTLPR (chromosom 17) wpływający na wychwyt zwrotny serotoniny; jeden z alleli tego genu („s” – od short) powiązany jest z niską odpowiedzią (LR) i zwiększoną tolerancją na alkohol (cecha charakteryzująca się odziedziczalnością na poziomie 0,4–0,6), co sprzyja spożywaniu dużych ilości alkoholu oraz uzależnieniu [13–15].
Zgodnie z istniejącym poglądem czynniki genetyczne związane z polimorfizmem wielu genów mogą warunkować cechy pośrednie nazywane „endofenotypami”, które – razem z oddziaływaniem czynników środowiskowych – determinują ryzyko spożywania dużych ilości alkoholu i uzależnienia [15–17]. Wyróżnia się endofenotypy odnoszące się do ogólnej predyspozycji do uzależnień od wielu substancji, wynikającej m.in. z określonych cech osobowości czy wzorów zachowań, oraz endofenotypy odnoszące się do uzależnienia od alkoholu, np. związane z LR. Endofenotyp dotyczący predyspozycji do uzależnień, powiązany z fenotypem osobowości antysocjalnej, impulsywności, drażliwości, odhamowania, może być warunkowany polimorfizmem genów kodujących receptory neuroprzekaźników, np. genu GABRA2 (chromosom 4), który koduje podjednostkę α-2 receptora błonowego wiążącego kwas gamma-aminomasłowy (GABA). Inne polimorfizmy, które mogą być związane z tym endofenotypem, dotyczą zmienności genu muskarynowego receptora acetylocholiny M2 (CHRM2, chromosom 7), genu dehydrogenazy aldehydowej (ADH4, chromosom 4), genu receptora dopaminy D4 (DRD4, chromosom 11), genu receptora dopaminy D2 (DRD2, chromosom 2) czy genu ACN9 (chromosom 7) [15, 18].
Inny endofenotyp może być związany z aktywnością enzymów uczestniczących w metabolizowaniu alkoholu, w tym dehydrogenaz alkoholowych (ADH) i aldehydowych (ALDH) [15, 19, 20]. Warianty genów kodujących ww. enzymy mogą zwiększać lub zmniejszać predyspozycje do uzależnienia przez wpływ na liczbę generowanych produktów przemian alkoholu, głównie aldehydu octowego. Najlepiej poznanym genem, którego mutacje mają związek z uzależnieniem od alkoholu, jest gen dehydrogenazy aldehydowej (ALDH2) zlokalizowany na chromosomie 12. Jeden z wariantów tego genu (ALDH2*2) jest związany z niemal całkowicie (u homozygot) lub częściowo zmniejszoną aktywnością katalityczną kodowanego enzymu, co na poziomie biochemicznym skutkuje zwiększonym stężeniem aldehydu octowego, a klinicznie manifestuje się w postaci zespołu nietolerancji alkoholu [15]. Mniejsze ryzyko uzależnienia od alkoholu jest związane m.in. z polimorficznymi wariantami genów dehydrogenazy alkoholowej: allelem *2 ADH1B rs1229984 SNP i allelem *1 ADH1C rs1693482 SNP (chromosom 4). Enzymy kodowane przez zmutowane geny prowadzą do przyspieszonego metabolizowania alkoholu (odpowiednio: 38-krotnie i 2,5-krotnie) w porównaniu z szybkością konwersji alkoholu do aldehydu octowego przez enzym kodowany przez allele *1 ADH1B i *2 ADH1C; szybkie metabolizowanie alkoholu z wytworzeniem acetaldehydu związane jest z niekorzystną reakcją w postaci nudności i zaczerwienienia twarzy [15, 21]. Opublikowane wyniki badań, omówione w dalszej części pracy, wskazują na to, że genem związanym z konsumpcją alkoholu może być FTO. Gen ten został zidentyfikowany jako potencjalny „gen ryzyka” w jednym z przeprowadzonych badań GWAS.

Badania GWAS dotyczące zaburzeń związanych z używaniem alkoholu

Dzięki najnowszym technikom genetyczno-informatycznym możliwe jest prowadzenie badań w skali całego genomu (GWAS). W tej strategii, która zrewolucjonizowała zakres badań genetycznych, stosuje się tzw. mikromacierze DNA, umożliwiające jednoczesną analizę setek tysięcy polimorfizmów pojedynczego nukleotydu (single nucleotide polymorphism – SNP), reprezentujących znaczny odsetek powszechnie występujących wariantów w genomie człowieka, w celu zidentyfikowania wariantów genetycznych związanych z ryzykiem wystąpienia określonego fenotypu. Badania te są kosztowne, wymagają też analizowania dużej liczby (wielu tysięcy) uczestników grup badanych i kontrolnych. Ponieważ w strategii GWAS nie są przyjmowane założenia a priori w odniesieniu do genów kandydujących, jej wynikiem może być odkrycie nowych loci genowych, dotąd niekojarzonych z chorobą.
W 12 badaniach GWAS poświęconych konsumpcji alkoholu, których wyniki zostały opublikowane w latach 2009–2014, wskazano SNP w genach kodujących enzymy metabolizujące alkohol jako powiązane z ryzykiem uzależnienia [22]. W metaanalizie danych dotyczących 14 904 osób uzależnionych od alkoholu oraz 37 944 osób z grupy kontrolnej wykazano związek dwóch wariantów genu dehydrogenazy alkoholowej 1B (alcohol dehydrogenase 1B, class I beta polypeptid – ADH1B) z ryzykiem uzależnienia. Metaanaliza wyników badań GWAS (N > 105 000 osób pochodzenia europejskiego) pozwoliła wskazać gen kodujący białko β-klotho (KLB) (chromosom 4) jako czynnik modulujący spożycie alkoholu [23]. GWAS wykonane z użyciem próbek z brytyjskiego Biobanku pozwoliło na identyfikację obszarów związanych z konsumpcją alkoholu łącznie w 8 loci, w tym:
• 3 loci genów kodujących białka biorące udział w metabolizowaniu alkoholu, zlokalizowanych na chromosomie 4: genu kodującego dehydrogenazę alkoholową 1B, klasy I, polipeptyd beta (ADH1B), genu kodującego dehydrogenazę alkoholową 1C, klasy I, polipeptyd gamma (ADH1C) oraz genu ADH5 kodującego dehydrogenazę alkoholową 5, klasy III, polipeptyd chi;
• 2 loci genu kodującego białko Klotho (KLB);
• 3 nowe loci genów ryzyka: genu kodującego białko regulatorowe glukokinazy (GCKR) (chromosom 2), genu kodującego cząsteczkę adhezji komórkowej 2 (CADM2) (chromosom 3) oraz genu kodującego białka rodziny z podobieństwa sekwencji 69, człon C (FAM69C, DIPK1C) (chromosom 18) [24].
W 2019 r. opublikowano wyniki GWAS dotyczącego zaburzeń spowodowanych przez nadużywanie alkoholu. Zaburzenia diagnozowano przy użyciu testu przesiewowego oceniającego konsumpcję alkoholu i problemy związane z ryzykownym i szkodliwym piciem opracowanego przez WHO i znanego pod nazwą AUDIT [25]. W badaniu Kranzlera i wsp. użyto podskali AUDIT-C oceniającej częstość i ilość spożywanego alkoholu oraz częstość spożywania alkoholu w nadmiernych ilościach. Zidentyfikowano 10 niezależnych loci w populacji Amerykanów pochodzenia europejskiego, 2 loci u Afroamerykanów i 2 loci w grupie Latynoamerykanów. Metaanaliza danych wszystkich badanych populacji pozwoliła wskazać 10 loci, w tym 3, dla których związek z użyciem alkoholu wykazywano już we wcześniejszych badaniach: ADH1B (chromosom 4), ADH1C (chromosom 4) i ADH4 (chromosom 4) oraz kilka loci wcześniej nieopisywanych:
• GCKR (chromosom 2),
• gen kodujący białko homeotyczne SIX3 (SIX3) (chromosom 2),
• gen kodujący białko z rodziny nośników substancji rozpuszczonych (solute carrier family 39 member 8 – SLC39A8) (chromosom 4),
• gen receptora dopaminy DRD2 (chromosom 11),
• locus na chromosomie 10 q25.1,
• gen podatności na otyłość – FTO (chromosom 16) [25].

Gen FTO – charakterystyka ogólna

Gen FTO został zidentyfikowany po raz pierwszy w 2007 r. podczas badań asocjacyjnych na poziomie całego genomu, tzw. Genome-Wide Association Study (GWAS). Zlokalizowany jest na długim ramieniu chromosomu 16 – locus 16q12.2 (ryc. 1) i koduje białko z rodziny AlkB o aktywności demetylazy kwasów nukleinowych. Jest to gen stosunkowo duży – składa się z 9 eksonów, a jego długość wynosi ponad 400 kb. FTO ulega ekspresji głównie w podwzgórzu. Odgrywa ważną rolę w zarządzaniu energetyczną homeostazą organizmu oraz w regulacji masy tkanki tłuszczowej przez wpływ na lipolizę i różnicowanie preadipocytów, jednak dokładna funkcja fizjologiczna tego genu nie została jeszcze w pełni poznana [26–34] (ryc. 1). FTO jest genem polimorficznym. Dotychczas opisano kilka wariantów strukturalnych tego genu typu CNV (zmienność liczby kopii) i 87 028 wariantów typu SNP, spośród których 87 stanowią zmiany o potencjalnym bądź udowodnionym znaczeniu klinicznym [35]. Gen FTO – związek z depresją i otyłością Podstawą do sformułowania hipotezy o związku polimorfizmu FTO z piciem alkoholu były obserwacje dotyczące jego powiązania z depresją i otyłością. Jak już wspomniano, depresja występuje z większą częstością w rodzinach osób uzależnionych od alkoholu. Wykazano, że spożywanie alkoholi wysokoprocentowych wiąże się z wyższymi wartościami wskaźników otyłości [36–39]. Wpływ konsumpcji wina lub piwa na wskaźniki otyłości w różnych badaniach był oceniany pozytywnie [38–40], negatywnie [38, 41] bądź nie został odnotowany [42]. Wykazano, że wzór picia charakteryzujący się częstym spożywaniem małych ilości alkoholu może zapobiegać otyłości [43–45], cukrzycy, chorobom sercowo-naczyniowym [46, 47]. Prawdopodobny mechanizm polega na indukcji mikrosomalnego układu utleniającego etanol [48, 49] i/lub hamowaniu wydzielania greliny, która odpowiada za zachowania związane z żywieniem [50, 51].
Publikowane wyniki badań wskazały na związek niektórych wariantów polimorficznych FTO ze wzrostem wskaźnika masy ciała (BMI), a także ze zmianami metabolicznymi, takimi jak wyższy poziom insuliny, glukozy i triglicerydów (badanych na czczo) oraz obniżony poziom „dobrego” cholesterolu HDL (lipoproteiny wysokiej gęstości). Odnotowano związek między określonymi wariantami genu FTO a zwiększonym obwodem talii, jak też z większą masą ciała [26, 27]. Jednym z najczęściej badanych polimorfizmów FTO jest rs9930506 SNP, w obrębie którego wyróżnia się allele A i G. Istotny wpływ wariantu FTO na występowanie otyłości zaobserwowano w badaniach obejmujących populację polską. Wykazano, że obecność allela G polimorfizmu rs9930506 FTO zwiększa ryzyko rozwoju otyłości w populacji polskiej. Ponadto homozygoty GG charakteryzują się wyższymi wartościami wskaźnika BMI niż nosiciele allela A, średnio o 1,5 kg/m2 [26, 27, 29, 30]. W innych badaniach polimorfizmu FTO (rs9939609), z rozróżnieniem alleli T i A, allel A predysponował do fenotypu hiperfagicznego i/lub preferencji pokarmów o dużej wartości energetycznej [52–54]. Odnotowana zależność polimorfizmu FTO od poszczególnych preferencji żywieniowych miała charakter powtarzalny [51, 54–61].
Obserwacje dotyczące powiązania otyłości z depresją doprowadziły do poszukiwania związku między polimorfizmem FTO a ryzykiem depresji. Samaan i wsp. w 2013 r. wykazali, że wariant A FTO rs9939609 SNP może być związany z niższym ryzykiem depresji, niezależnie od jego wpływu na BMI [62]. Z kolei w innych badaniach, których wyniki opublikowano w 2014 r., wykazano, że wariant rs9939609 FTO determinuje zwiększone ryzyko depresji, w szczególności o nietypowym przebiegu [63].

Gen FTO – związek z konsumpcją alkoholu

W badaniu przekrojowym polskiej populacji przyjęto hipotezę, że polimorfizm genu FTO rs9939609 może być powiązany z modelem konsumpcji alkoholu. Ze względu na złożoną zależność między spożywaniem alkoholu a BMI, w celu weryfikacji tej hipotezy, przeprowadzono szereg analiz wieloczynnikowych, w których uwzględniano różne modele konsumpcji związane z rodzajem alkoholu, ilością i częstością picia. W analizach uwzględniano również ilości spożywanego czystego alkoholu wyrażone w gramach na dobę (gram/day, g/d). Wykazano, że osoby z genotypem AA FTO rs9939609 SNP spożywały duże ilości alkoholu z niską częstotliwością, podczas gdy osoby z pozostałymi genotypami piły codziennie małe ilości alkoholu [51]. W przypadku konsumentów piwa lub wódki genotyp AA FTO rs9939609 SNP był związany ze spożywaniem mniejszej o 0,21 g/dobę (p < 0,012) ilości czystego alkoholu w porównaniu z osobami z pozostałymi genotypami. Nie odnotowano podobnej zależności w odniesieniu do konsumpcji wina.
Zależność między genotypem AA FTO rs9939609 SNP a ilością i częstością spożywania alkoholu była istotna po uwzględnieniu w analizie takich parametrów, jak płeć, wiek i BMI. Dla spirytusu dane uzyskane w analizie wieloczynnikowej, uwzględniającej płeć i wiek, przedstawiały się w sposób następujący: dla częstości spożywania spirytusu wartość ilorazu szans (OR) związana z posiadaniem genotypu AA FTO rs9939609 SNP wyniosła 0,89, 95% przedział ufności (CI) mieścił się w zakresie 0,81–0,99; p < 0,025, a dla ilości spożywanego spirytusu wartość OR wyniosła 1,06; 95% CI: 1,00–1,12; p < 0,034. W analizie wieloczynnikowej uwzględniającej płeć, wiek i BMI wskaźniki częstości spożywania spirytusu wyniosły OR 0,89; 95% CI: 0,81–0,98; p < 0,02, natomiast wskaźniki dotyczące ilości nie były istotne statystycznie (OR 1,05; 95% CI: 0,99–1,1; p < 0,88). Dla piwa, w analizie wieloczynnikowej uwzględniającej płeć i wiek, odnotowano niższą częstość spożywania tego alkoholu związaną z genotypem AA FTO rs9939609 SNP (OR 0,92; 95% CI: 0,87–0,98; p < 0,006), nie odnotowano natomiast wpływu genotypu na ilość spożywanego piwa (OR 1,08; 95% CI: 0,90–1,28; p < 0,422). W analizie wieloczynnikowej uwzględniającej płeć, wiek i BMI odnotowano związek genotypu AA FTO rs9939609 SNP z mniejszą częstością spożywania piwa (OR 0,92; 95% CI: 0,87–0,98, p < 0,00); związek z ilością spożywanego piwa pozostał nieistotny (OR 1,08; 95% CI: 0,9–1,28, p < 0,42). Jeśli chodzi o wino, to w analizie wieloczynnikowej uwzględniającej płeć i wiek nie odnotowano związku między genotypem AA FTO rs9939609 SNP a częstotliwością (OR 0,98; 95% CI: 0,88–1.08, p < 0,622) i ilością (OR 1,00; 95% CI: 0,90–1,10, p < 0,993) spożywania tego alkoholu. Gdy w analizie wieloczynnikowej uwzględniono płeć, wiek i BMI, odnotowano związek genotypu z niższą częstością spożywania wina: OR 0,92; 95% CI: 0,87–0,98; p < 0,006; związek genotypu z ilością wypijanego wina pozostał nieistotny (OR 0,98; 95% CI: 0,89–1,08; p < 0,70) [51].
W analizie związku genotypów FTO z rodzajem alkoholu, ilością i częstotliwością picia wykazano, że wśród osób spożywających spirytus częściej niż 1–2 razy w tygodniu w ilości mniejszej niż 100 ml częstość występowania genotypu AA FTO rs9939609 SNP była istotnie niższa niż wśród osób spożywających ten rodzaj alkoholu w ilości przekraczającej 100 ml (odpowiednio: 11,0% vs 20,0%; OR 0,46; 95% CI: 0,30–0,71; p < 0,0004). Nie odnotowano różnic w częstości występowania genotypów FTO pomiędzy osobami spożywającymi spirytus rzadziej niż 1–2 razy w tygodniu w ilości mniejszej bądź większej niż 100 ml (odpowiednio: 20,6% vs 21,2%). Różnice w rozkładzie genotypów FTO związane ze spożyciem piwa miały podobny charakter jak te w przypadku spirytusu. Wśród osób spożywających piwo częściej niż 1–2 razy w tygodniu w ilości mniejszej niż 0,5 l częstość występowania genotypu AA FTO rs9939609 SNP była nieco niższa niż wśród osób spożywających piwo w ilości przekraczającej 0,5 l (odpowiednio: 18,0% vs 21,0%; OR = 0,77; 95% CI: 0,55–1,06; p < 0,11). Nie odnotowano różnic w częstości występowania genotypów FTO pomiędzy osobami spożywającymi piwo rzadziej niż 1–2 razy w tygodniu w ilości mniejszej bądź większej niż 0,5 l (odpowiednio: 21,0% vs 22,2%) [51]. Osoby z genotypem AA FTO rs9939609 SNP charakteryzowało spożywanie większych ilości alkoholi wysokoprocentowych, ale z mniejszą częstością w porównaniu z osobami posiadającymi genotyp AT lub TT (ryc. 2).
W badanych grupach osób uzależnionych od alkoholu odnotowano niższą częstość występowania genotypu AA FTO rs9939609 SNP (14%) w porównaniu z grupą osób biorących wcześniej udział w polskim Wieloośrodkowym Ogólnopolskim Badaniu Stanu Zdrowia Ludności (20,4%). W celu dokładniejszego oszacowania częstości występowania genotypu AA FTO rs9939609 SNP wśród osób uzależnionych od alkoholu zastosowano model nieaddytywny oraz addytywny analizy regresji. W obu modelach odnotowano niższą częstość genotypu AA (model regresji: OR 0,64; 95% CI: 0,45–0,89; p < 0,005; model addytywny: OR 0,78; 95% CI: 0,66–0,93; p < 0,004) [51]. W badaniach Corella i wsp. oceniono związek między nosicielstwem dwóch polimorficznych fragmentów genów: FTO rs9939609 i MCR4 rs17782313 a ilością spożywanego czystego alkoholu (wyrażaną w gramach na dobę, g/d) wśród osób z grupy ryzyka chorób układu sercowo-naczyniowego. Gen MCR4 zlokalizowany w chromosomie 18q22 koduje receptor melanokortyny 4 (MC4R), który jest białkiem 322-aminokwasowym. Należy do rodziny siedmiu receptorów transbłonowych sprzężonych z białkiem G i przekazuje sygnał przez sprzężenie z heterotrimerycznym białkiem Gs i aktywację cyklazy adenylowej. Wyraża się głównie w jądrach podwzgórzowych zaangażowanych w regulację spożycia pokarmu, integruje sygnał sytości dostarczany przez melanotropinę α (α-MSH) i sygnał antagonistyczny (oreksygeniczny) dostarczany przez białko agouti (AGRP). Aktywacja MC4R przez agonistów naturalnych lub farmakologicznych prowadzi do zmniejszenia ilości przyjmowanego pokarmu. Rola tego białka w utrzymaniu bilansu energetycznego została wykazana u myszy. Myszy z genetycznie uwarunkowanym brakiem obu alleli MC4R (myszy MC4R –/–) rozwijają ciężką otyłość, natomiast u myszy heterozygotycznych (myszy MC4R +/–) występuje fenotyp pośredni między MC4R –/– i fenotypem dzikim. Gen MC4R koduje receptor melanokortyny 4 znajdujący się w rejonie podwzgórza. MC4R odgrywa ważną rolę w regulacji apetytu i reakcji na głód. Udowodniono, że osoby z genotypem CC lub CT MC4R mają większą skłonność do podjadania między posiłkami i zwiększony apetyt. Polimorfizmy genów FTO i MC4R badano sumarycznie w modelu współdominującym, zależnym od liczby zmiennych alleli obydwu genów. Analizowano rozkład genotypów FTO rs9939609 SNP: TT, TA, AA, oraz MC4R rs17782313: TT, TC, CC [64].
Wykazano, że osoby posiadające genotyp związany z jednoczesną obecnością 4 wariantów FTO rs9939609 SNP i MCR4 rs17782313 SNP spożywały istotnie mniej alkoholu, przy uwzględnieniu w analizie wpływu takich parametrów, jak płeć, wiek, cukrzyca, całkowite spożycie energii, aktywność fizyczna, niż osoby o mniejszej liczbie alleli badanych genów. W wielowymiarowych badaniach dotyczących średniego spożycia alkoholu w zależności liczby alleli FTO i MCR4 stwierdzono, że w grupie charakteryzującej się występowaniem 4 wariantów tych genów średnie spożycie czystego alkoholu wyniosło 6,5 g/d, dla grupy z 3 wariantami genów: 7,2 g/d, dla grupy z 2 wariantami: 8,5 g/d, dla grupy z 1 wariantem: 8,9 g/d, a dla osób posiadających 4 allele typu dzikiego: 9,3 g/d, p < 0,001 [64].
W analizach, w których zamiast danych ilościowych dotyczących spożywania alkoholu uwzględniono dane jakościowe odnoszące się do zachowywania lub niezachowywania (umiarkowane lub wysokie spożycie alkoholu) abstynencji, odnotowano również statystycznie znaczący związek między sumarycznym wskaźnikiem zróżnicowania liczby alleli badanych genów a nawykami picia. Największy odsetek niepijących odnotowano w grupie osób posiadających 4 warianty FTO i MCR4, w porównaniu z grupą osób z 4 allelami typu dzikiego (odpowiednio: 43,4% vs 36,5%; ptrend < 0,01). Natomiast w grupie charakteryzującej się spożywaniem dużych ilości alkoholu największy odsetek stanowiły osoby posiadające 4 allele FTO i MCR4 typu dzikiego (14,5%), a najmniej było osób z grupy z 4 wariantami genu (5,7%; ptrend < 0,01). Odnotowane różnice osiągały większą istotność statystyczną w populacji mężczyzn, wśród których spożycie alkoholu było wyższe niż u kobiet. Wśród mężczyzn niepijących największy odsetek stanowiły osoby z grupy z 4 wariantami (28,6%) w porównaniu z grupą osób z 4 allelami typu dzikiego (15,1%). Z kolei w grupie pijących mężczyzn najczęstszy genotyp był związany z obecnością 4 alleli typu dzikiego FTO i MCR4 (27%), a najrzadszy dotyczył występowania 4 zmiennych kopii tych genów (14,3%) [64].
Ocena zależności między ilością spożywanego czystego alkoholu, wyrażaną w gramach na tydzień (gram/week, g/w), a występowaniem SNP FTO rs17817449 i rs9939609 była przedmiotem badań Hubacek i wsp. [65]. Autorzy zwrócili uwagę na zjawisko nierównowagi sprzężeń tych dwóch polimorfizmów FTO równe 100%. W tym badaniu uwzględniono 3 kohorty: a) kohorta czeska badana w ramach projektu o akronimie MONICA (Monitoring trends and determinants in cardiovascular disease) – 2559 osób uczestniczących w badaniach dotyczących chorób sercowo-naczyniowych, b) kohorta badana w ramach projektu o akronimie HAPIEE (Health, Alcohol and Psychosocial factors In Eastern Europe) – 6681 osób uczestniczących w części czeskiej badań dotyczących zdrowia, alkoholu i czynników psychospołecznych w Europie Wschodniej, c) kohorta Serbów zamieszkujących we wschodnich Niemczech – 948 osób. Dokonano również analiz genotypów rs17817449 wśród 201 czeskich pacjentów z alkoholową marskością wątroby. Dane analizowano przy użyciu regresji logistycznej z addytywnym trybem włączania zmiennych, z uwzględnieniem wieku i płci. W żadnej z badanych populacji nie wykryto istotnego związku między genotypem rs9939609 lub rs17817449 a spożywaniem alkoholu. Wartości p dla analiz dotyczących zależności między występowaniem rs9939609 lub rs17817449 w poszczególnych kohortach a ilością spożywanego alkoholu wyniosły 0,47 dla kohorty MONICA, 0,37 dla kohorty HAPIEE i 0,82 dla kohorty Sorbs. Wykazano, że częstość występowania genotypów CC, CT i TT FTO nie różniła się istotnie między trzema badanymi kohortami. Analiza wyników dotyczących kohorty HAPIEE wykazała, że średnie spożycie czystego alkoholu (w g/w) z uwzględnieniem poszczególnych genotypów CC, CT i TT wyniosło odpowiednio: 174 g/w, 187 g/w i 177 g/w; p < 0,92. Nie stwierdzono istotnych statystycznie różnic w częstości występowania poszczególnych genotypów FTO w zbiorczych danych dla czeskich kohort (n = 9148, CC = 18,7%, CT = 48,3%, TT = 33,0%) i u pacjentów z alkoholową marskością wątroby (n = 201, CC = 13,9%, CT = 53,7%, TT = 32,3%, p < 0,16) [65].
W badaniu Wang i wsp., obejmującym dwie grupy kontrolne i dwie grupy osób uzależnionych od alkoholu pochodzące z badań COGA (Collaborative Studies on Genetics of Alcoholism) oraz SAGE (Study on global AGEing and adult health), analizie poddano 167 SNP FTO [66]. Przeprowadzona analiza regresji logistycznej pozwoliła wskazać allele FTO najsilniej powiązane z nadmiernym spożywaniem alkoholu wśród badanych grup. W grupie SAGE wytypowano allele T SNP rs8062891 (p < 0,00088), C SNP rs1108086 (p < 0,00086) i T SNP rs1420318 (p < 0,00086) jako związane z nadmiernym spożywaniem alkoholu. Allele T SNP rs12597786 i C SNP rs7204609 były istotnie związane z nadmiernym spożywaniem alkoholu także w grupie COGA (odpowiednio p < 0,017 i p < 0,014). W metaanalizie obejmującej dane dotyczące genetycznych wariantów ryzyka uzależnienia od alkoholu dla dwóch grup łącznie wskazano trzy polimorficzne warianty genów najsilniej związane z ryzykiem alkoholizmu: allel T SNP rs8062891 (p < 0,00064), allel T SNP rs12597786 (p < 0,00076) i allel C SNP rs7204609 (p < 0,0011) [66].
Podjęta została również próba określenia związku między FTO SNP rs17817449 z rozróżnieniem genotypów TT, GT i GG a ilością spożywanego czystego alkoholu (w g/w), z uwzględnieniem płci [67]. Analizie poddano dane 26 792 dorosłych osób rasy białej (47,2% mężczyzn; średni wiek 58,9 ± 7,3 roku) z Czech, Litwy, Polski i Rosji. Analizowano m.in. dane dotyczące ilości tygodniowo spożywanego alkoholu, tendencji do upijania się oraz pozytywnego wyniku testu CAGE ≥ 2, służącego do wychwycenia wczesnych symptomów picia ryzykownego/szkodliwego. W badaniu nie stwierdzono istotnych różnic w ilości spożywanego alkoholu w ciągu tygodnia ani w tendencji do upijania się między homozygotami GG i nosicielami co najmniej jednego allela T wśród przedstawicieli obu płci. Wśród mężczyzn z genotypem GG odsetek potwierdzonych przypadków testem CAGE ≥ 2 był niższy niż w grupie z genotypem TT lub GT rs17817499 SNP (17,8% vs 20,3%, p < 0,036). Podobnej zależności nie zaobserwowano u kobiet. Po uwzględnieniu wieku i kraju pochodzenia potwierdzono związek między genotypem GG a zmniejszonym ryzykiem uzyskania pozytywnego wyniku testu CAGE ≥ 2 wśród mężczyzn. Uwzględnienie w analizie zmiennych społeczno-demograficznych, jak również BMI i nadciśnienia nie zmieniło tej zależności [67].

Wnioski

Przytoczone wyniki badań wskazują na istnienie zależności między wariantami genu FTO a konsumpcją alkoholu. Zaobserwowano, że:
1) istnieje związek między genotypem FTO a modelem konsumpcji alkoholu dotyczącym rodzaju, częstotliwości i ilości (g/d, g/w) spożywanego alkoholu (wino/wódka/piwo) [51];
2) związek genotypu FTO z modelem spożywania alkoholu (ilość/częstość/rodzaj) zależy także od genotypu innych genów, w tym MC4R [64];
3) związek między genotypem FTO a modelem spożywania alkoholu zależy od populacji [65];
4) istnieją warianty FTO korelujące ze zwiększoną predyspozycją do spożywania dużych ilości alkoholu, w tym rs806289 – allel T [66];
5) związek genotypu GG FTO rs17817449 z ilością spożywanego alkoholu zależy od płci i jest silniej wyrażony u mężczyzn [67].

Conflict of interest/Konflikt interesów

None declared./Nie występuje.

Financial support/Finansowanie

None declared./Nie zadeklarowano.

Ethics/Etyka

The work described in this article has been carried out in accordance with the Code of Ethics of the World Medical Association (Declaration of Helsinki) on medical research involving human subjects, Uniform Requirements for manuscripts submitted to biomedical journals and the ethical principles defined in the Farmington Consensus of 1997.
Treści przedstawione w pracy są zgodne z zasadami Deklaracji Helsińskiej odnoszącymi się do badań z udziałem ludzi, ujednoliconymi wymaganiami dla czasopism biomedycznych oraz z zasadami etycznymi określonymi w Porozumieniu z Farmington w 1997 roku.

References/Piśmiennictwo

1. Kania-Żak A, Przybysz I. Wpływ alkoholu na organizm. Psychodietetyka 2017; 4. Available at: https://www.wspolczesnadietetyka.pl/psychodietetyka/wplyw-alkoholu-na-
2. organizm (Accessed: 12.01.2021).
3. Czy picie alkoholu ma wpływ na organizm? Szpital Uniwersytecki nr 2 im dr. Jana Biziela w Bydgoszczy. Available at: https://www.biziel.umk.pl/assets/files/CZY_PICIE_ALKOHOLU_MA_WPLYW_NA_ORGANIZM.pdf (Accessed: 14.05.2020).
4. Wiciński M, Soroko A, Niedźwiecki P, Ciemna K, Malinowski B, Grześk E, et al. Wpływ alkoholu na wybrane jednostki chorobowe. Wino czerwone – fakty i mity. Przegląd badań klinicznych (według EBM). Współczesne kierunki działań prozdrowotnych 2015; 159-68.
5. Wierońska JM, Cieślik P. Glutaminian i jego receptory, czyli o tym, jak można uleczyć mózg. Wszechświat 2017; 7-9: 178-87.
6. Szukalski B. Neurobiologiczne podstawy uzależnienia od narkotyków. Patofizjologia 2009; 9: 655-64.
7. Drożak J, Bryła J. Dopamina – nie tylko neuroprzekaźnik. Postepy Hig Med Dosw 2005; 59: 405-20.
8. Kostowski W. Dopamina a mechanizmy nagrody i rozwój uzależnień: fakty i hipotezy. Alkohol Narkom 2000; 2: 189-212.
9. Vetulani J. Alkoholizm i neurobiologia farmakoterapii alkoholizmu. Wszechświat 2013; 1-3: 24-30.
10. Koroś E, Bieńkowski P, Kostowski W. Od motywacji do „nagrody”: eksperymentalne modele „głodu” i nawrotów picia alkoholu etylowego. Alkohol Narkom 2000; 14(1): 59-76.
11. Wojewódzki program profilaktyki i rozwiązywania problemów alkoholowych na lata 2018-2021. Available at: https://bip.lubuskie.pl/system/obj/36773_13_WPPiRPA_zalacznik_do_uchwaly.pdf (Accessed: 19.01.2021).
12. Abramowicz M, Brosz M, Bykowska-Godlewska B, Michalski T, Strzałkowska A. Wzorce konsumpcji alkoholu. Studium socjologiczne. Kawle Dolne: Wydawnictwo Zakładu Realizacji Badań Społecznych Q&Q; 2018.
13. National Institute of Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism. Alcohol addiction and genetic.
14. Available at: https://www.addictioncenter.com/alcohol/genetics-of-alcoholism (Accessed:
15. 12.01.2021).
16. Heath AC, Madden PA, Bucholz KK, Dinwiddie SH, Slutske WS, Bierut LJ, et al. Genetic differences in alcohol sensitivity and the inheritance of alcoholism risk. Psychol Med 1999; 29: 1069-108.
17. Schuckit MA, Edenberg HJ, Kalmijn J, Flury L, Smith TL, Reich T, et al. A genome-wide search for genes that relate to a low level of response to alcohol. Alcohol Clin Exp Res 2001; 25: 323-9.
18. Mayfield RD, Harris RA, Schuckit MA. Genetic factors influencing alcohol dependence. Br J Pharmacol 2008; 154(2): 275-87.
19. Goldman D. General and specific inheritance of substance abuse and alcoholism (commentary). Arch Gen Psychiatry 1998; 55: 964-5.
20. Gottesman II, Gould TD. The endophenotype concept in psychiatry: etymology and strategic intentions. Am J Psychiatry 2003; 160: 636-45.
21. Dick DM, Aliev F, Wang JC, Saccone S, Hinrichs A, Bertelsen S, et al. A systematic single nucleotide polymorphism screen to fine-map alcohol dependence genes on chromosome 7 identifies association with a novel susceptibility gene ACN9. Biol Psychiatry 2008; 63(11): 1047-53.
22. Li TK. Pharmacogenetics of responses to alcohol and genes that influence alcohol drinking. J Stud Alcohol 2000; 61: 5-12.
23. Wall TL, Shea SH, Luczak SE, Cook TAR, Carr LG. Genetic associations of alcohol dehydrogenase with alcohol use disorders and endophenotypes in white college students. J Abnorm Psychol 2005; 114: 456-65.
24. Tolstrup JS, Nordestgaard BG, Rasmussen S, Tybjaerg-Hansen A, Grønbaek M. Alcoholism and alcohol drinking habits predicted from alcohol dehydrogenase genes. Pharmacogenomics J 2008; 8(3): 220-7.
25. Hart AB, Kranzler HR. Alcohol dependence genetics: lessons learned from genome-wide association studies (GWAS) and post-GWAS analyses. Alcohol Clin Exp Res 2015; 39: 1312-27.
26. Schumann G, Liu C, O’Reilly P, Gao H, Song P, Xu B, et al. KLB is associated with alcohol drinking, and its gene product β-Klotho is necessary for FGF21 regulation of alcohol preference. Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 2016; 113(50): 14372-7.
27. Clarke T, Adams M, Davies G, Howard DM, Hall LS, Padmanabhan S, et al. Genome-wide association study of alcohol consumption and genetic overlap with other health-related traits in UK Biobank (N = 112,117). Mol Psychiatry 2017; 22: 1376-84.
28. Kranzler HR, Zhou H, Kember RL,Vickers Smith R, Justice AC, Damrauer S, et al. Genome-wide association study of alcohol consumption and use disorder in 274,424 individuals from multiple populations. Nat Commun 2019; 10(1): 1499.
29. Wrzosek MA. Autoreferat – postępowanie habilitacyjne dr n. farm. Małgorzaty Wrzosek. Warszawa; 2018.
30. Wrzosek MA, Zakrzewska A, Ruczko L, Jabłonowska-Lietz B, Nowicka G. Association between rs9930506 polymorphism of the fat mass & obesity-associated (FTO) gene & onset of obesity in Polish adults. Indian J Med Res 2016; 143(3): 281-7.
31. Fredriksson R, Hägglund M, Olszewski PK, Stephansson O, Jacobsson JA, Olszewska AM, et al. The obesity gene, FTO, is of ancient origin, up-regulated during food deprivation and expressed in neurons of feeding-related nuclei of the brain. Endocrinology 2008; 149(5): 2062-71.
32. Kolackov K, Łaczmański Ł, Bednarek-Tupikowska G. Wpływ polimorfizmów genu FTO na ryzyko otyłości. Endokrynologia, Otyłość i Zaburzenia Przemiany Materii 2010; 6(2): 101-7.
33. Woźny Ł, Wojtas E, Chuchmacz G, Gola M, Grzeszczak W. Polimorfizm rs9930506 genu FTO a zawartość tkanki tłuszczowej w organizmie u osób zgłaszających się do poradni ogólnej podstawowej opieki zdrowotnej. Ann Acad Med Siles 2015; 69: 60-6.
34. Hess ME, Hess S, Meyer KD, Verhagen LA, Koch L, Brönneke HS, et al. The fat mass and obesity associated gene (Fto) regulates activity of the dopaminergic midbrain circuitry. Nat Neurosci 2013; 16(8): 1042-8.
35. Zhang M, Zhang Y, Ma J, Guo F, Cao Q, Zhang Y, et al. The demethylase activity of FTO (fat mass and obesity associated protein) is required for preadipocyte differentiation. PLoS One 2015; 10(7): 1-15.
36. Genetics Home Reference. Available at: https://ghr.nlm.nih.gov/gene/FTO (Accessed: 22.05.2020).
37. Ulloa AE, Chen J, Vergara VM, Calhoun V, Liu J. Association between copy number variation losses and alcohol dependence across African American and European American ethnic groups. Alcohol Clin Exp Res 2014; 38(5): 1266-74.
38. Baza danych GeneCards. Available at: https://www.genecards.org/cgi-bin/carddisp.pl?gene=FTO (Accessed: 22.05.2020).
39. Duncan BB, Chambless LE, Schmidt MI, Folsom AR, Szklo M, Crouse JR, et al. Association of the waist-to-hip ratio is different with wine than with beer or hard liquor consumption. Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Study Investigators. Am J Epidemiol 1995; 142: 1034-8.
40. Lapidus L, Bengtsson C, Hallstrom T, Bjorntorp P. Obesity, adipose tissue distribution and health in women – results from a population study in Gothenburg, Sweden. Appetite 1989; 13: 25-35.
41. Slattery ML, McDonald A, Bild DE, Caan BJ, Hilner JE, Jacobs DR, et al. Associations of body fat and its distribution with dietary intake, physical activity, alcohol, and smoking in blacks and whites. Am J Clin Nutr 1992; 55: 943-9.
42. Wannamethee SG, Shaper AG, Whincup PH. Alcohol and adiposity: effects of quantity and type of drink and time relation with meals. Int J Obes (Lond) 2005; 29: 1436-44.
43. Dallongeville J, Marecaux N, Ducimetiere P, Ferrieres J, Arveiler D, Bingham A, et al. Influence of alcohol consumption and various beverages on waist girth and waist-to-hip ratio in a sample of French men and women. Int J Obes Relat Metab Disord 1998; 22: 1178-83.
44. Rosmond R, Bjorntorp P. Psychosocial and socio-economic factors in women and their relationship to obesity and regional body fat distribution. Int J Obes Relat Metab Disord 1999; 23: 138-45.
45. Bobak M, Skodova Z, Marmot M. Beer and obesity: a crosssectional study. Eur J Clin Nutr 2003; 57: 1250-3.
46. Istvan J, Murray R, Voelker H. The relationship between patterns of alcohol consumption and body weight. Lung Health Study Research Group. Int J Epidemiol 1995; 24: 543-6.
47. Dorn JM, Hovey K, Muti P, Freudenheim JL, Russell M, Nochajski TH, et al. Alcohol drinking patterns differentially affect central adiposity as measured by abdominal height in women and men. J Nutr 2003; 133: 2655-62.
48. Tolstrup JS, Heitmann BL, Tjonneland AM, Overvad OK, Sorensen TI, Gronbaek MN. The relation between drinking pattern and body mass index and waist and hip circumference. Int J Obes (Lond) 2005; 29: 490-7.
49. Kauhanen J, Kaplan GA, Goldberg DE, Salonen R, Salonen JT. Pattern of alcohol drinking and progression of atherosclerosis. Arterioscler Thromb Vasc Biol 1999; 19: 3001-6.
50. O’Keefe JH, Bybee KA, Lavie CJ. Alcohol and cardiovascular health: the razor-sharp double-edged sword. J Am Coll Cardiol 2007; 50: 1009-14.
51. Buemann B, Astrup A. How does the body deal with Energy from alcohol? Nutrition 2001; 17: 638-41.
52. Lands WE, Zakhari S. The case of the missing calories. Am J Clin Nutr 1991; 54: 47-8.
53. Badaoui A, De Saeger C, Duchemin J, Gihousse D, de Timary P, Starkel P. Alcohol dependence is associated with reduced plasma and fundic ghrelin levels. Eur J Clin Invest 2008; 38: 397-403.
54. Sobczyk-Kopciol A, Broda G, Wojnar M, Kurjata P, Jakubczyk A, Klimkiewicz A, et al. Inverse association of the obesity predisposing FTO rs9939609 genotype with alcohol consumption and risk for alcohol dependence. Addiction 2011; 06(4): 739-48.
55. Frayling TM, Timpson NJ, Weedon MN, Zeggini E, Freathy RM, Lindgren CM, et al. A common variant in the FTO gene is associated with body mass index and predisposes to childhood and adult obesity. Science 2007; 316: 889-94.
56. Hinney A, Vogel CI, Hebebrand J. From monogenic to polygenic obesity: recent advances. Eur Child Adolesc Psychiatry 2010; 19: 297-310.
57. Cecil JE, Tavendale R, Watt P, Hetherington MM, Palmer CNA. An obesity-associated FTO gene variant and increased energy intake in children. N Engl J Med 2008; 359: 2558-66.
58. Speakman JR, Rance KA, Johnstone AM. Polymorphisms of the FTO gene are associated with variation in energy intake, but not energy expenditure. Obesity 2008; 16: 1961-5.
59. Timpson NJ, Emmett PM, Frayling TM, Rogers I, Hattersley AT, McCarthy MI, et al. The fat mass- and obesity-associated locus and dietary intake in children. Am J Clin Nutr 2008; 88: 971-8.
60. Wardle J, Carnell S, Haworth CM, Farooqi IS, O’Rahilly S, Plomin R. Obesity associated genetic variation in FTO is associated with diminished satiety. J Clin Endocrinol Metab 2008; 93: 3640-3.
61. Wardle J, Llewellyn C, Sanderson S, Plomin R. The FTO gene and measured food intake in children. Int J Obes 2008; 33: 42-5.
62. den Hoed M, Westerterp-Plantenga MS, Bouwman FG, Mariman EC, Westerterp KR. Postprandial responses in hunger and satiety are associated with the rs9939609 single nucleotide polymorphism in FTO. Am J Clin Nutr 2009; 90: 1426-32.
63. Haupt A, Thamer C, Staiger H, Tschritter O, Kirchhoff K, Machicao F, et al. Variation in the FTO gene influences food intake but not energy expenditure. Exp Clin Endocrinol Diabetes 2009; 117: 194-7.
64. Tanofsky-Kraff M, Han JC, Anandalingam K, Shomaker LB, Columbo KM, Wolkoff LE, et al. The FTO gene rs9939609 obesity-risk allele and loss of control over eating. Am J Clin Nutr 2009; 90: 1483-8.
65. Samaan Z, Anand SS, Zhang X, Desai D, Rivera M, Pare G, et al. The protective effect of the obesity-associated rs9939609 A variant in fat mass- and obesity-associated gene on depression. Mol Psychiatry 2013; 18(12): 1281-6.
66. Milaneschi Y, Lamers F, Mbarek H, Hottenga JJ, Boomsma DI, Penninx BW. The effect of FTO rs9939609 on major depression differs across MDD subtypes. Mol Psychiatry 2014; 19(9): 960-2.
67. Corella D, Ortega-Azorín C, Sorlí JV, Covas MI, Carrasco P, Salas-Salvadó J, et al. Statistical and biological gene-lifestyle interactions of MC4R and FTO with diet and physical activity on obesity: new effects on alcohol consumption. PLoS One 2012; 7(12): 1-14.
68. Hubacek JA, Adamkova V, Dlouha D, Jirsa M, Šperl J, Tönjes A, et al. Fat mass and obesity-associated (fto) gene and alcohol intake. Addiction 2012; 107(6): 1185-6.
69. Wang L, Liu X, Luo X, Zeng M, Zuo L, Wang KS. Genetic variants in the fat mass- and obesity-associated (FTO) gene are associated with alcohol dependence. J Mol Neurosci 2013; 51(2): 416-24.
70. Hubacek JA, Pikhart H, Peasey A, Malyutina S, Pajak A, Tamosiunas A et al. The association between the FTO gene variant and alcohol consumption and binge and problem drinking in different gene-environment background: The HAPIEE study. Gene 2019; 30(707): 30-5.
1. Kania-Żak A, Przybysz I. Wpływ alkoholu na organizm. Psychodietetyka 2017; 4. Available at: https://www.wspolczesnadietetyka.pl/psychodietetyka/wplyw-alkoholu-na-
2. organizm (Accessed: 12.01.2021).
3. Czy picie alkoholu ma wpływ na organizm? Szpital Uniwersytecki nr 2 im dr. Jana Biziela w Bydgoszczy. Available at: https://www.biziel.umk.pl/assets/files/CZY_PICIE_ALKOHOLU_MA_WPLYW_NA_ORGANIZM.pdf (Accessed: 14.05.2020).
4. Wiciński M, Soroko A, Niedźwiecki P, Ciemna K, Malinowski B, Grześk E, et al. Wpływ alkoholu na wybrane jednostki chorobowe. Wino czerwone – fakty i mity. Przegląd badań klinicznych (według EBM). Współczesne kierunki działań prozdrowotnych 2015; 159-68.
5. Wierońska JM, Cieślik P. Glutaminian i jego receptory, czyli o tym, jak można uleczyć mózg. Wszechświat 2017; 7-9: 178-87.
6. Szukalski B. Neurobiologiczne podstawy uzależnienia od narkotyków. Patofizjologia 2009; 9: 655-64.
7. Drożak J, Bryła J. Dopamina – nie tylko neuroprzekaźnik. Postepy Hig Med Dosw 2005; 59: 405-20.
8. Kostowski W. Dopamina a mechanizmy nagrody i rozwój uzależnień: fakty i hipotezy. Alkohol Narkom 2000; 2: 189-212.
9. Vetulani J. Alkoholizm i neurobiologia farmakoterapii alkoholizmu. Wszechświat 2013; 1-3: 24-30.
10. Koroś E, Bieńkowski P, Kostowski W. Od motywacji do „nagrody”: eksperymentalne modele „głodu” i nawrotów picia alkoholu etylowego. Alkohol Narkom 2000; 14(1): 59-76.
11. Wojewódzki program profilaktyki i rozwiązywania problemów alkoholowych na lata 2018-2021. Available at: https://bip.lubuskie.pl/system/obj/36773_13_WPPiRPA_zalacznik_do_uchwaly.pdf (Accessed: 19.01.2021).
12. Abramowicz M, Brosz M, Bykowska-Godlewska B, Michalski T, Strzałkowska A. Wzorce konsumpcji alkoholu. Studium socjologiczne. Kawle Dolne: Wydawnictwo Zakładu Realizacji Badań Społecznych Q&Q; 2018.
13. National Institute of Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism. Alcohol addiction and genetic.
14. Available at: https://www.addictioncenter.com/alcohol/genetics-of-alcoholism (Accessed:
15. 12.01.2021).
16. Heath AC, Madden PA, Bucholz KK, Dinwiddie SH, Slutske WS, Bierut LJ, et al. Genetic differences in alcohol sensitivity and the inheritance of alcoholism risk. Psychol Med 1999; 29: 1069-108.
17. Schuckit MA, Edenberg HJ, Kalmijn J, Flury L, Smith TL, Reich T, et al. A genome-wide search for genes that relate to a low level of response to alcohol. Alcohol Clin Exp Res 2001; 25: 323-9.
18. Mayfield RD, Harris RA, Schuckit MA. Genetic factors influencing alcohol dependence. Br J Pharmacol 2008; 154(2): 275-87.
19. Goldman D. General and specific inheritance of substance abuse and alcoholism (commentary). Arch Gen Psychiatry 1998; 55: 964-5.
20. Gottesman II, Gould TD. The endophenotype concept in psychiatry: etymology and strategic intentions. Am J Psychiatry 2003; 160: 636-45.
21. Dick DM, Aliev F, Wang JC, Saccone S, Hinrichs A, Bertelsen S, et al. A systematic single nucleotide polymorphism screen to fine-map alcohol dependence genes on chromosome 7 identifies association with a novel susceptibility gene ACN9. Biol Psychiatry 2008; 63(11): 1047-53.
22. Li TK. Pharmacogenetics of responses to alcohol and genes that influence alcohol drinking. J Stud Alcohol 2000; 61: 5-12.
23. Wall TL, Shea SH, Luczak SE, Cook TAR, Carr LG. Genetic associations of alcohol dehydrogenase with alcohol use disorders and endophenotypes in white college students. J Abnorm Psychol 2005; 114: 456-65.
24. Tolstrup JS, Nordestgaard BG, Rasmussen S, Tybjaerg-Hansen A, Grønbaek M. Alcoholism and alcohol drinking habits predicted from alcohol dehydrogenase genes. Pharmacogenomics J 2008; 8(3): 220-7.
25. Hart AB, Kranzler HR. Alcohol dependence genetics: lessons learned from genome-wide association studies (GWAS) and post-GWAS analyses. Alcohol Clin Exp Res 2015; 39: 1312-27.
26. Schumann G, Liu C, O’Reilly P, Gao H, Song P, Xu B, et al. KLB is associated with alcohol drinking, and its gene product β-Klotho is necessary for FGF21 regulation of alcohol preference. Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 2016; 113(50): 14372-7.
27. Clarke T, Adams M, Davies G, Howard DM, Hall LS, Padmanabhan S, et al. Genome-wide association study of alcohol consumption and genetic overlap with other health-related traits in UK Biobank (N = 112,117). Mol Psychiatry 2017; 22: 1376-84.
28. Kranzler HR, Zhou H, Kember RL,Vickers Smith R, Justice AC, Damrauer S, et al. Genome-wide association study of alcohol consumption and use disorder in 274,424 individuals from multiple populations. Nat Commun 2019; 10(1): 1499.
29. Wrzosek MA. Autoreferat – postępowanie habilitacyjne dr n. farm. Małgorzaty Wrzosek. Warszawa; 2018.
30. Wrzosek MA, Zakrzewska A, Ruczko L, Jabłonowska-Lietz B, Nowicka G. Association between rs9930506 polymorphism of the fat mass & obesity-associated (FTO) gene & onset of obesity in Polish adults. Indian J Med Res 2016; 143(3): 281-7.
31. Fredriksson R, Hägglund M, Olszewski PK, Stephansson O, Jacobsson JA, Olszewska AM, et al. The obesity gene, FTO, is of ancient origin, up-regulated during food deprivation and expressed in neurons of feeding-related nuclei of the brain. Endocrinology 2008; 149(5): 2062-71.
32. Kolackov K, Łaczmański Ł, Bednarek-Tupikowska G. Wpływ polimorfizmów genu FTO na ryzyko otyłości. Endokrynologia, Otyłość i Zaburzenia Przemiany Materii 2010; 6(2): 101-7.
33. Woźny Ł, Wojtas E, Chuchmacz G, Gola M, Grzeszczak W. Polimorfizm rs9930506 genu FTO a zawartość tkanki tłuszczowej w organizmie u osób zgłaszających się do poradni ogólnej podstawowej opieki zdrowotnej. Ann Acad Med Siles 2015; 69: 60-6.
34. Hess ME, Hess S, Meyer KD, Verhagen LA, Koch L, Brönneke HS, et al. The fat mass and obesity associated gene (Fto) regulates activity of the dopaminergic midbrain circuitry. Nat Neurosci 2013; 16(8): 1042-8.
35. Zhang M, Zhang Y, Ma J, Guo F, Cao Q, Zhang Y, et al. The demethylase activity of FTO (fat mass and obesity associated protein) is required for preadipocyte differentiation. PLoS One 2015; 10(7): 1-15.
36. Genetics Home Reference. Available at: https://ghr.nlm.nih.gov/gene/FTO (Accessed: 22.05.2020).
37. Ulloa AE, Chen J, Vergara VM, Calhoun V, Liu J. Association between copy number variation losses and alcohol dependence across African American and European American ethnic groups. Alcohol Clin Exp Res 2014; 38(5): 1266-74.
38. Baza danych GeneCards. Available at: https://www.genecards.org/cgi-bin/carddisp.pl?gene=FTO (Accessed: 22.05.2020).
39. Duncan BB, Chambless LE, Schmidt MI, Folsom AR, Szklo M, Crouse JR, et al. Association of the waist-to-hip ratio is different with wine than with beer or hard liquor consumption. Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Study Investigators. Am J Epidemiol 1995; 142: 1034-8.
40. Lapidus L, Bengtsson C, Hallstrom T, Bjorntorp P. Obesity, adipose tissue distribution and health in women – results from a population study in Gothenburg, Sweden. Appetite 1989; 13: 25-35.
41. Slattery ML, McDonald A, Bild DE, Caan BJ, Hilner JE, Jacobs DR, et al. Associations of body fat and its distribution with dietary intake, physical activity, alcohol, and smoking in blacks and whites. Am J Clin Nutr 1992; 55: 943-9.
42. Wannamethee SG, Shaper AG, Whincup PH. Alcohol and adiposity: effects of quantity and type of drink and time relation with meals. Int J Obes (Lond) 2005; 29: 1436-44.
43. Dallongeville J, Marecaux N, Ducimetiere P, Ferrieres J, Arveiler D, Bingham A, et al. Influence of alcohol consumption and various beverages on waist girth and waist-to-hip ratio in a sample of French men and women. Int J Obes Relat Metab Disord 1998; 22: 1178-83.
44. Rosmond R, Bjorntorp P. Psychosocial and socio-economic factors in women and their relationship to obesity and regional body fat distribution. Int J Obes Relat Metab Disord 1999; 23: 138-45.
45. Bobak M, Skodova Z, Marmot M. Beer and obesity: a crosssectional study. Eur J Clin Nutr 2003; 57: 1250-3.
46. Istvan J, Murray R, Voelker H. The relationship between patterns of alcohol consumption and body weight. Lung Health Study Research Group. Int J Epidemiol 1995; 24: 543-6.
47. Dorn JM, Hovey K, Muti P, Freudenheim JL, Russell M, Nochajski TH, et al. Alcohol drinking patterns differentially affect central adiposity as measured by abdominal height in women and men. J Nutr 2003; 133: 2655-62.
48. Tolstrup JS, Heitmann BL, Tjonneland AM, Overvad OK, Sorensen TI, Gronbaek MN. The relation between drinking pattern and body mass index and waist and hip circumference. Int J Obes (Lond) 2005; 29: 490-7.
49. Kauhanen J, Kaplan GA, Goldberg DE, Salonen R, Salonen JT. Pattern of alcohol drinking and progression of atherosclerosis. Arterioscler Thromb Vasc Biol 1999; 19: 3001-6.
50. O’Keefe JH, Bybee KA, Lavie CJ. Alcohol and cardiovascular health: the razor-sharp double-edged sword. J Am Coll Cardiol 2007; 50: 1009-14.
51. Buemann B, Astrup A. How does the body deal with Energy from alcohol? Nutrition 2001; 17: 638-41.
52. Lands WE, Zakhari S. The case of the missing calories. Am J Clin Nutr 1991; 54: 47-8.
53. Badaoui A, De Saeger C, Duchemin J, Gihousse D, de Timary P, Starkel P. Alcohol dependence is associated with reduced plasma and fundic ghrelin levels. Eur J Clin Invest 2008; 38: 397-403.
54. Sobczyk-Kopciol A, Broda G, Wojnar M, Kurjata P, Jakubczyk A, Klimkiewicz A, et al. Inverse association of the obesity predisposing FTO rs9939609 genotype with alcohol consumption and risk for alcohol dependence. Addiction 2011; 06(4): 739-48.
55. Frayling TM, Timpson NJ, Weedon MN, Zeggini E, Freathy RM, Lindgren CM, et al. A common variant in the FTO gene is associated with body mass index and predisposes to childhood and adult obesity. Science 2007; 316: 889-94.
56. Hinney A, Vogel CI, Hebebrand J. From monogenic to polygenic obesity: recent advances. Eur Child Adolesc Psychiatry 2010; 19: 297-310.
57. Cecil JE, Tavendale R, Watt P, Hetherington MM, Palmer CNA. An obesity-associated FTO gene variant and increased energy intake in children. N Engl J Med 2008; 359: 2558-66.
58. Speakman JR, Rance KA, Johnstone AM. Polymorphisms of the FTO gene are associated with variation in energy intake, but not energy expenditure. Obesity 2008; 16: 1961-5.
59. Timpson NJ, Emmett PM, Frayling TM, Rogers I, Hattersley AT, McCarthy MI, et al. The fat mass- and obesity-associated locus and dietary intake in children. Am J Clin Nutr 2008; 88: 971-8.
60. Wardle J, Carnell S, Haworth CM, Farooqi IS, O’Rahilly S, Plomin R. Obesity associated genetic variation in FTO is associated with diminished satiety. J Clin Endocrinol Metab 2008; 93: 3640-3.
61. Wardle J, Llewellyn C, Sanderson S, Plomin R. The FTO gene and measured food intake in children. Int J Obes 2008; 33: 42-5.
62. den Hoed M, Westerterp-Plantenga MS, Bouwman FG, Mariman EC, Westerterp KR. Postprandial responses in hunger and satiety are associated with the rs9939609 single nucleotide polymorphism in FTO. Am J Clin Nutr 2009; 90: 1426-32.
63. Haupt A, Thamer C, Staiger H, Tschritter O, Kirchhoff K, Machicao F, et al. Variation in the FTO gene influences food intake but not energy expenditure. Exp Clin Endocrinol Diabetes 2009; 117: 194-7.
64. Tanofsky-Kraff M, Han JC, Anandalingam K, Shomaker LB, Columbo KM, Wolkoff LE, et al. The FTO gene rs9939609 obesity-risk allele and loss of control over eating. Am J Clin Nutr 2009; 90: 1483-8.
65. Samaan Z, Anand SS, Zhang X, Desai D, Rivera M, Pare G, et al. The protective effect of the obesity-associated rs9939609 A variant in fat mass- and obesity-associated gene on depression. Mol Psychiatry 2013; 18(12): 1281-6.
66. Milaneschi Y, Lamers F, Mbarek H, Hottenga JJ, Boomsma DI, Penninx BW. The effect of FTO rs9939609 on major depression differs across MDD subtypes. Mol Psychiatry 2014; 19(9): 960-2.
67. Corella D, Ortega-Azorín C, Sorlí JV, Covas MI, Carrasco P, Salas-Salvadó J, et al. Statistical and biological gene-lifestyle interactions of MC4R and FTO with diet and physical activity on obesity: new effects on alcohol consumption. PLoS One 2012; 7(12): 1-14.
68. Hubacek JA, Adamkova V, Dlouha D, Jirsa M, Šperl J, Tönjes A, et al. Fat mass and obesity-associated (fto) gene and alcohol intake. Addiction 2012; 107(6): 1185-6.
69. Wang L, Liu X, Luo X, Zeng M, Zuo L, Wang KS. Genetic variants in the fat mass- and obesity-associated (FTO) gene are associated with alcohol dependence. J Mol Neurosci 2013; 51(2): 416-24.
70. Hubacek JA, Pikhart H, Peasey A, Malyutina S, Pajak A, Tamosiunas A et al. The association between the FTO gene variant and alcohol consumption and binge and problem drinking in different gene-environment background: The HAPIEE study. Gene 2019; 30(707): 30-5.
This is an Open Access journal distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs (CC BY-NC-ND) (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/legalcode), allowing third parties to download and share its works but not commercially purposes or to create derivative works.
facebook linkedin twitter
© 2021 Termedia Sp. z o.o. All rights reserved.
Developed by Bentus.
PayU - płatności internetowe